Goldenseal Pro Progress- Smart Fields & Qt (Feb 8)

Accounting software is all about accounts: the people and companies you do business with. There may be hundreds or thousands of them. MacNail Accounting, our first attempt at job costing software, gave everyone a number. Data entry meant using a printed cheat sheet (or memorizing numbers). It was easy to make mistakes.

For Goldenseal, we found a better way: clairvoyant fields. They pop up a list of items when you start to type, so you can just use regular names for your accounts. Usually you type a few letters, and get what you want. Worst case, you scroll through a list or use a pop-up button.

Goldenseal Pro still has the same thing, but with a name change to smart fields. They are an important part of our estimating and accounting software.

For example, when you enter a Material Purchase, smart fields link it to a vendor account, sales tax rate, payment method and payment terms. They allocate job costs to a project, cost category and subcategory. Smart fields may also tie the expense to an allowance, bid, change order, room, unit or project phase.

Goldenseal does useful stuff with all those links. It sets up Accounts Payable, or pays the vendor instantly. It gives you expense reports and job cost reports. It does time & materials billing for projects. If you include an itemized breakdown, it updates material prices for future estimates.

You may interact with smart fields hundreds of times per day. Because of that, they need to perform well. It took some effort to make that happen in the current Goldenseal.

Last week we used the Qt framework to set up smart fields for Goldenseal Pro. After a couple days they already look great, and perform properly.

Smart fields are the last interface detail we were worried about. As a tool for finishing Goldenseal Pro, Qt has aced the test. It’s going to build the new 64-bit interface on a reasonable schedule. Wheee!

For the short term, the question is: how long will it take to finish? We don’t have enough experience with Qt to answer that yet. It took 3 years with Cocoa to get roughly half to 2/3 done. So far, programming with Qt has gone about 4x faster than Cocoa. If that math continues, the best guess is another year or so.

One uncertainty is Apple’s new M1 chip. We won’t have to change our code for it, but the Qt framework needs an update to run natively there. Qt is mostly open-source, and folks are working on M1 compatibility now. They probably will finish before we do. It helps that TurtleSoft doesn’t use anything fancy in Qt— just the basics. BTW that need to rewrite for M1 is a big part of why we decided to halt Cocoa development. It was last straw on camel’s back.

For the medium term of five to ten years, my biggest concern is that the Qt Company probably will get bought. It could be swallowed by any big fish that sees strategic value in them: Apple, Google, Microsoft, Oracle. Nokia owned Qt for a while, and maybe they will re-buy before they get swallowed. With luck the actual Qt framework won’t suffer too much from assimilation, so we’ll get a 10 year lifetime or more.

For the real long term, we’ve found out the hard way that long term planning does not exist for software. It’s risky to rely on any small or medium-sized company: they often disappear. It’s risky to rely on the big players: their frameworks and tools often disappear (or become useless). Maybe things will settle down some decade, but probably not soon.

Dennis Kolva
Programming Director
TurtleSoft.com

Author: Dennis Kolva

Programming Director for Turtle Creek Software. Design & planning of accounting and estimating software.