Covid-19 in New York #6 (Jan 12)

In July, the local Internet provider asked me to do some in-home wiring for a few of their clients. Most of the folks were good about masking and social distancing, but one couple wasn’t. They didn’t wear masks, and got physically close to me even after I asked them not to. I left early, and decided not to go back there. Someone else finished the work.

Soon after that, the couple tested positive for Covid-19. Not surprising, considering their behavior. The second installer had to quarantine. Luckily, I was outside the exposure time window. Phew.

Lately, it feels like there are more bullets to dodge. Cases have turned up in Home Depot, Walmart, most supermarkets, the Post Office, public transport. Since March I’ve kept a spreadsheet of public places where I’ve been, and when. There have been a few near misses, but nothing close enough to need a quarantine. Yet.

New York just entered phase 1B of their vaccination program. As an over-65 I’m qualified to get a vaccine as of today. Theoretically, I’d prefer to wait a bit. For one thing, the Moderna and Pfizer vaccines are well-tested and probably fine, but they are a new technology. I’d rather let other people be the guinea pigs, just in case there are long-term, subtle effects.

Also, they were the quickest to release. It’s possible there will be a future, more dangerous pandemic. If so, it would suck if my immune system had learned how to zap their mRNA carriers. Waiting a couple of months for Johnson & Johnson or AstraZeneca is kinda like saving the big guns for when they are really needed.

A traditional killed-virus vaccine would be best of all, since that approach is extremely well-tested. However those take years to develop. That’s a long time to be living in a bubble. Plus, any vaccines that haven’t started trials yet will have a hard time finding test subjects who weren’t vaccinated or infected. They may never get out the door.

Meanwhile, active cases have spiked locally, similar to the rest of the US. Covid-19 got into one of the local nursing homes right after Thanksgiving, and the number of county deaths jumped quickly from 1 to 17. That seems to be how the disease works in other places, also.

Since Christmas, the number hospitalized here has varied from 20 to 32. That’s much worse than the Spring ’20 surge, which maxed at 16 and was only over 5 for a few days. Here’s the chart to date:

Thick blue is active cases divided by 10. Red is the number in hospital, which lags by a few weeks. There was a spike of active cases in early March, but tests were scarce then so it’s not in this chart.

Most surrounding counties are having a worse time than here. Cattaraugus only updates their website once or twice a week now, ever since new cases jumped from a few a day to a few dozen. They used to be much more chatty. Chautauqua (next door to them) has 111 hospital beds, and 131 patients. Steuben has 774 active cases, 2,214 residents in quarantine (2% of their population), and only 15 contact tracers. They’ve had 153 Covid deaths so far in a population about the same as here.

The Rt tracker website is a good predictor for future disease impact. As of today 15 states are below 1.0 and reducing their active cases. 36 are above it, and still getting worse. Now that the holidays are over, there’s more hope it will improve.

One (tiny) good impact of Covid-19 is that many people put up extra Christmas lights this year. Walking around at night has become very entertaining. Winter is a bit less bleak.

Now we just need to survive Jan 20.

Dennis Kolva
Programming Director
TurtleSoft.com

Author: Dennis Kolva

Programming Director for Turtle Creek Software. Design & planning of accounting and estimating software.