Health Departments & Politics (Oct 21)

I’ve been more than a bit obsessed with Covid-19 since it started. For a while it was almost a full-time gig. These days it’s calmed down to just a few hours a week: reading science papers, and spot-checking a few websites.

Among them are sites for Health Departments in some nearby counties. They vary. All have current numbers, but some break it down by towns; some give a brief description of each case; some have lists of places where infected people visited. Right after the Sturgis rally, Cattaraugus County (4 to the west) even mentioned that two cases were in people just returned from South Dakota. That’s a long motorcycle ride.

The sites are entertaining, in a geeky sort of way. I keep adding more counties, and now visit 15 of their sites. Reading between the lines, they paint a picture of what the pandemic must be like for staff in local Health Departments.

Pre-Covid, their biggest job was inspecting restaurants and other food services. Keep perishables below 45° or above 145°F, don’t put meat above salads in the fridge, control rodents and the like. They also administered WIC, and tried to keep people from catching STDs or growing too obese. Flu shots. Toxic algae blooms. Ticks and Lyme disease. Mosquitoes and West Nile. Opioids. Tobacco. Rabies.

Most of these departments are pretty small. They already had a lot on their plate. This year they’ve been in crisis mode for seven months already, and the battle has just started.

Contact tracing and quarantines are an important part of controlling a communicable disease like Covid-19. That’s mostly what they do now. I’m sure it is not an easy job. You’ve got to ask people where they’ve been, and who they were close to. Then persuade them to stay home for a couple weeks. Plenty of people resent authority or think it’s all a hoax. Even the best will be tempted to sneak out for a bit. You’ve got to deal with all that, and probably don’t have much enforcement power.

Normally I avoid talking about politics. As a business owner, I’m significantly less liberal than most folks here in Ithaca. As an Ithacan, I’m more liberal than most people using our software. It’s not worth arguing about.

Thing is, right now the US probably is headed into a major emergency. A once in a century situation. It’s right in the middle of an election for President, all of the House and 1/3 of Senators. Plus local races.

Both political parties got together in March, and signed the CARES act to support people and organizations affected by the pandemic. Since then, it’s been gridlock and antagonism.

All those local Health Departments will make the difference between a moderately bad Fall/Winter season for Covid-19, and a runaway disaster (or lock-downs and economic damage). To keep everyone safe, they need more staff to trace contacts. More tests. More resources to support folks in quarantine so they don’t wander off and infect others. Problem is, the states and counties that pay them are facing bigger expenses, and reduced revenues. They can’t print money to make up the difference. They need help.

And of course, many individual people are in the same boat. Life got a lot more complicated and generally worse in March. It’s not turning any corners, anytime soon. It will take extremely competent leadership to manage the next phase of the pandemic, and recover from the economic damage. States and counties can only do so much. Covid-19 is exactly the kind of problem that needs full attention at the Federal level. It’s not happening now.

You might say this country needs to come together to fight a common enemy: the coronavirus that causes Covid-19. And maybe come together for other stuff also. Life was already headed downhill for many people, even before March 2020.

I miss the days when there were liberal Republicans and conservative Democrats. When politicians compromised and solved problems (at least some of the time). Voting in a politician is a lot like hiring an employee or subcontractor. In the end, competence and integrity are what counts.

Dennis Kolva
Programming Director
TurtleSoft.com

Author: Dennis Kolva

Programming Director for Turtle Creek Software. Design & planning of accounting and estimating software.