Goldenseal Pro Progress Report #1

Ahhh.  We signed with a new contractor late last week, and he is already making good progress.  It is refreshing to have someone who actually works on the project, instead of stringing us along with promises and excuses.

Both projects are now set up, and the first Cocoa code is now in the Mac version.  We are talking over various design issues, and he is using the debugger to step through the original Windows project in CodeWarrior, to understand how it works.

It was interesting putting Goldenseal into Visual Studio, the past 2 weeks.  It caught dozens of small errors, that the previous compilers didn’t see.  I don’t think any were causing serious bugs, but it’s still good to have tidy code.

Dennis Kolva
Programming Director
Turtle Creek Software

Goldenseal Pro Progress Report #00

We are talking with a new contractor for Goldenseal Pro. Our current one is working on several other projects, and not dedicating enough time to ours.  He did some setup work but hasn’t written any code yet.  Fortunately, we’ve found someone else who will work on our project exclusively, and probably make much faster progress.

Meanwhile, the Turtlesoft programming staff is back to working on Goldenseal Pro, for a while at least.   We’ve loaded most of the source code into Visual Studio (which we will use to build the Windows version).  Its compiler gave a few warnings about code that is potentially unsafe, so we are rewriting it now.  This kind of “refactoring” is an ongoing process that gradually makes the code more reliable, and easier to maintain.

Dennis Kolva
Programming Director
Turtle Creek Software

 

Goldenseal Pro Progress Report #0

We now have a Visual Studio project set up, to build the Windows version of Goldenseal Pro.  The source code framework is compiling, and we are ready to start actual new programming.

Visual Studio has some differences from the other compilers we have used (CodeWarrior and Xcode), which means long lists of mystery error messages that take a while to slog through.

Fortunately, now that all the prep work is finished, from here on out we can build Goldenseal with the “standard” compilers that almost everyone uses to build large apps: Xcode for Mac, and Visual Studio for Windows.  We plan to work on both platforms in parallel, which lets us tune the basic design so it works well with both.  That way it should be less effort to handle the inevitable future OS changes.

If this were a house, we’d be at the stage where demolition is done and deficient framing has been replaced, and it’s ready to start the plumbing and electrical upgrades.

Dennis Kolva
Programming Director
Turtle Creek Software